Getting Beyond American Tastification

tastification.jpg

Learning to taste the four basic tastes using a Heineken, Miller High Life, Guinness Stout in a bottle (from Canada), Sapporo (also from Canada) and Modelo (from Mexico). Those beers introduce sweet, bitter, sour and shunk.

5 Replies to “Getting Beyond American Tastification”

  • Clayton says:

    Just wanted to say that I love the show and am learning a lot. I am 26 and just started drinking beer this last year. I always avoided it because the only people I saw drinking beer were drinking to get drunk. They had a huge case of it and drank it as fast as they could.

    Then I came to meet people who had more of a sophisticated approach to drinking beer and I had my first “Fat Tire”. I didn’t like it but it was my first beer. Since then I have come to really enjoy fat tire, red stripe, New Castle, and several from my local brewery’s. I avoid cheep beer like the plage and have never had a bud, coors, miller, heini, or corona. I look forward to the next show.

    I live in Idaho but maybe some day I’ll be in cali and can come drink w/ you as you do the show.

  • Tombstone0 says:

    I heard about your show on Macbreak Weekly, so I jumped over here and checked it out.
    During the first episode I was thinking that these guys should try out Dogfish Head beer and of course you mentioned them in the next episode. By the way, they’re located in Delaware, of course that’s very close to New Jersey.

  • camkerr says:

    Love the show, (I know i’m 20 but that is legal in Canada). By the way, the bottling place Guelph is pronounced “Gwell-f” =D

  • inspector_gadget says:

    Hi guys – have been listening to the comments on TWiM, decided I’d check out the podcast. Am enjoying so far – trying to find as many of the beers as you mention as possible. European beers are no problem, can get some of the better American stuff (my local serves both Anchor Steam and Sierra Nevada, for example). However, as an Irishman in Ireland, I reckon you might have some details wrong about the Guinness.

    Guinness has been available in bottles for a long long time (couldn’t put an accurate time frame on it, but definitely for over a century) – originally, it would have been bottled individually by each bar, so some of the more touristy bars here have a collection of the varying bottle and label styles dating back to the early 1900s, if not before. Up until maybe fifteen to twenty years ago, both half-pint and pint bottles would have been commonplace, but these days a lot of urban pubs don’t carry bottles any more (except for the “draught” bottles).

    I can only vouch for my own personal experience with regards to nitrogenation, but it’s been done for as long as I can remember (which would be about twenty years)

    Oh, and for what it’s worth, I’ve never seen one of those fast-pour devices for Guinness in this country. In the UK, yes, but not here. It’s just wrong, dagnabbit 🙂 If you don’t want to wait for the whole process (pour to about 3/4 full, leave to settle for a few minutes, top off) you can order just that first pour in some pubs – it’s sometimes called a “medium”.

    Keep up the good work!

  • inspector_gadget says:

    Hi guys – have been listening to the comments on TWiM, decided I’d check out the podcast. Am enjoying so far – trying to find as many of the beers as you mention as possible. European beers are no problem, can get some of the better American stuff (my local serves both Anchor Steam and Sierra Nevada, for example). However, as an Irishman in Ireland, I reckon you might have some details wrong about the Guinness.

    Guinness has been available in bottles for a long long time (couldn’t put an accurate time frame on it, but definitely for over a century) – originally, it would have been bottled individually by each bar, so some of the more touristy bars here have a collection of the varying bottle and label styles dating back to the early 1900s, if not before. Up until maybe fifteen to twenty years ago, both half-pint and pint bottles would have been commonplace, but these days a lot of urban pubs don’t carry bottles any more (except for the “draught” bottles).

    I can only vouch for my own personal experience with regards to nitrogenation, but it’s been done for as long as I can remember (which would be about twenty years)

    Oh, and for what it’s worth, I’ve _never_ seen one of those fast-pour devices for Guinness in this country. In the UK, yes, but not here. It’s just wrong, dagnabbit 🙂 If you don’t want to wait for the whole process (pour to about 3/4 full, leave to settle for a few minutes, top off) you can order just that first pour in some pubs – it’s sometimes called a “medium”.

    Keep up the good work!

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